Choosing International Adoption

Is International Adoption the right move for you?

As a Mom of a twenty-one year old daughter from S. Korea, I’m writing firsthand to inform you that you’re about to encounter one of the most wonderful and rewarding experiences of your life. My husband and I adopted our daughter at six months old.

Here’s a photo of her at 18 years old:

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OK, back to International Adoption. The following are eight insights to keep in mind:

  1. The process is intimidating. Remember that your decision will be affecting your life, and, more importantly, the life of your child. Prepare for a wait. We waited two years for our daughter. During that time, we completed pre-qualification forms, attended information meetings and home studies, and just waited.
  2.  The process is expensive. All agencies and countries are different, but costs include legal fees, home study costs, and adoption fees, which will vary by country.
  3. Flying to a foreign country. You may need to fly to your child’s country and stay sometimes an undetermined amount of time. That means you may not speak the language or be able to drink the tap water. Your home arrangements may include an undetermined leave of absence from your job, as well as care for your other children at home, pet care and home maintenance, etc. At the time we adopted our daughter from S. Korea, we were able to stay in the states and our daughter arrived with a Korean escort at Boston airport.
  4. Paperwork, paperwork, and more paperwork. Remember you’re not just dealing with the U.S. any more, but also your adopted child’s birth country. Plan on fingerprints, clearance, notaries, and reading and re-reading specific requirements.
  5. The Great Wait. As previously mentioned, we waited two years for our daughter, but plan on an average wait of 18-48 months. Each case is handled individually, so hang in there!
  6. Open vs. closed adoption. In most domestic cases, open adoption is encouraged, but you’ll probably have a closed adoption when adopting internationally because of strict privacy laws.
  7. Medical records. You’ll receive your child’s medical records, but because of translation, etc., keep in mind that these may or may not be accurate.
  8. Read and research. Respect your child’s birth country and customs. Educate your friends and family.

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My  Sweet Contemporary Romance Valentine Novella, I Love You More, explores International Adoption. http://amzn.com/B01BM25NBK

A billionaire and a single mother have more in common than they know.

He’s a billionaire businessman …

Luciano Donati, entrepreneur and eligible bachelor, lost his first wife to cancer. So though he lives in romantic Charleston, SC, he has every intention of ignoring the upcoming holiday for lovers … at least until he sets eyes again on his younger sister’s best friend.

He remembers Anastasia as a teenager who idolized him, not this lovely, fragile woman with heartbreak in her eyes. Heartbreak that he finds himself wanting to cure. Her smile warms his soul, her touch ignites his desire, and her little girl Soo-Min melts his frozen heart. Adopted internationally himself at a young age, Luciano understands all too well the strong need to belong somewhere.

She’s a single mom …

Anastasia Markow, cancer survivor and divorced mother, didn’t come to Charleston, SC for romance. She’s here to make sure she has custody of her adopted daughter, Soo-Min. But when she encounters the first man she ever loved, here in the city of horse-drawn carriages and candlelight, her battered heart can’t help but bloom again. And when Luciano and Soo-Min take to each other, resisting his charm becomes even harder.

Handsome, self-assured, every inch the successful billionaire, Luciano is out of Anastasia’s reach. But when a hurricane strands them together and they must trust each other to survive … things heat up despite the rain.

Author’s Note: Thousands of families around the world have opened their homes and hearts through international adoption. Soo-Min is the embodiment of many, many fortunate adoptive children and parents who’ve together created forever families.

Author Josie Riviera and her family are transplanted New Yorkers now living in the sunny Carolinas.
Visit Josie at her blog, The Italian Blog, at josieriviera.wordpress.com, and sign up for her newsletter.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Josie.Riviera/

Twitter: @josieriviera

Instagram: josie_riviera

Send her an email at: josieriviera@aol.com

 

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4 Responses to Choosing International Adoption

  1. nitethyme says:

    She’s gorgeous and I applaud you for going through the process. I have a friend who adopted a boy from Russia. My only thought is that there are so many children in this country that need a forever home. Linda

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Debby Grahl says:

    Josie, what a wonderful story! I have a friend who adopted two children from Russia. I live on Hilton head. Where are you in SC?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Josie says:

    True, Linda, but adoption, whether international of domestic, is still a long process.

    Like

  4. Josie says:

    That’s wonderful, Debby. We were actually in the both the S.Korea and Russian program at our adoption agency. We love Hilton Head! We live close to Charlotte, NC.

    Like

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