Tea for Two Tidbits

Five different types of tea would have been available to Regency England: white, yellow, green, oolong, and black.

The most common and popular teas were green and black, much as these two types of tea are the most popular today. In the Regency era, tea was served hot, with sugar and milk.

In my Regency Inspirational romance, Seeking Patience, Lady Patience Blakwell would have enjoyed tea during the day and evening.

tea-party-1138912_1280Tea was considered a safe drink in that era because it was boiled first because much of the drinking water in that period was contaminated.

Thomas Twining changed his coffee house into a tea shop in 1717. Then, Richard Twining, who was chairman of the tea dealers’ guild in 1784, persuaded the government to reduce the tea import tax. Once tea was more affordable, the middle classes were able to enjoy this cheap beverage.

Did you know? Tipping began as a response to ensuring proper service in the Tea Gardens of England. Small, locked wooden boxes were place throughout the Garden on tables. On each box was inscribed T.I.P.S., which meant “To Insure Prompt Service.” If a guest wanted to be certain that his tea arrived hot, he placed a coin into the box for the waiter. And thus, the custom of tipping servers was born.

Did you know? “Drinking tea” is a proper phrase. “Taking tea” is vulgar.

I love hot, green tea with no sugar and cream, just black, thank you.

How do you drink your tea?

Please leave a comment for a chance to win a copy of Seeking Patience, my Regency Inspirational Romance novel.

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Author Josie Riviera writes Historical, Inspirational, and Sweet Romances. She lives in the Charlotte, NC, area with her wonderfully supportive husband of 40 years. They share their empty nest with an adorable Shih Tzu who constantly needs grooming and an old house forever needing renovations.

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and receive a free ebook, Seeking Catherine.

“Bargained away to a brothel, she is beyond hope, beyond rescue…but not beyond the reach of the one man who can save her.”

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11 Responses to Tea for Two Tidbits

  1. Pamela Devereux says:

    Hot with no cream and one sugar. Iced with lemon and one sugar.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Josie says:

    Sounds good, Pam. I drink my hot tea the same way.

    Like

  3. I don’t drink much tea, but I do like it with real cream and sugar. Thanks for sharing, Josie. Interesting post. Best of luck with your novels!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Josie says:

    Yay Pamela! You’ve won a copy of Seeking Patience. Please email me at josieriviera@aol.com

    Congrats!

    Like

  5. Elizabeth Dent says:

    Hi Josie , I cannot drink tea for health problems , but if I could I would drink hot tea in the morning .

    Like

  6. marymarvella says:

    I prefer my tea iced!

    Liked by 1 person

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