Herbs and Flowers For A Fairy Garden

Who doesn’t want to attract fairies to their garden? Of all the herbs associated with the little folk, the most important one is thyme, which I love. I’m forever planting more varieties of thyme. In Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Titania, the fairy queen, sleeps in a bed of wild thyme growing on a bank. Sure. Why not?

creeping-thyme
Foxglove is also essential for a fairy garden. According to legend, fairies sleep in the bell-shaped flowers, and wear them as gloves. Which use they choose, probably depends upon the size of the fairy. Other common names for foxglove include fairy fingers, fairy thimbles, and fairy cap. However, I’m extremely challenged in growing foxglove in my farm garden(s). The plants soon figure out they’re not in their native dappled woodlands.

Colorful foxgloves

Colorful foxgloves

Another favorite herb is saffron, also known as the saffron crocus, which bloom in the fall. Fairies are said to be especially fond of this culinary herb/spice used for flavoring cakes and dyeing cloth. Other recommended plants are fragrant rosemary and roses. Roses are much loved by fairies for their beauty and divine scent, and by me. And I am never without rosemary. I bring these herbs indoors in pots in late fall. They’re not exuberant about life in my sunspace but generally survive to glory again in summer. Wood anemones are beautiful plants preferred by fairies because the flowers close at the onset of bad weather and at night and offer the tiny beings a safe spot to rest or wait out the bad weather. I have some anemones, also called windflowers. These beauties grace the spring garden.

rosemary-in-pot-outdoors-with-lavender-and-geranium1

Not to neglect bluebells, also beloved by fairies. These beautiful blue flowers that carpet woodlands in spring are also known as harebell, Scottish bellflower, and fairies thimble. It was, and maybe still is, widely believed that fairies live among the flowers. Another name for bluebells is Dead Man’s bells because fairies were thought to cast spells on those foolish enough to pick or damage the delicate blossoms.

When meandering through drifts of bluebells, it’s wise to stick to the path, or you may stir up the wrath of fairies and release the spells trapped in the blooms. Never a good idea, and one that would be echoed by our resident fairy expert, my 12-year-old niece, Cailin, who warns never step into a circle of flowers or go anywhere without the fairies’ permission, or they will get very upset. And you do not want an upset fairy, or fairies, on your hands. Particularly the furious wind fairies, but that’s another story.

bluebells-daffodils-and-tulips-smaller

A dear author friend of mine who is quite knowledgeable about fairies says they love many kinds of herbs and flowers. She has spotted some tiny ones in photographs of my garden. I’ve read they are drawn to the same plants that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Keep watch, you never know where they may be.

These images are all from my garden(s) except for the foxglove. I wish.

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About bethtrissel

Married to my high school sweetheart, I live on a farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia with my human family and furbabies. An avid gardener, my love of herbs and heirloom plants figures into my work. The rich history of Virginia, the Native Americans, and the people who journeyed here from far beyond her borders are at the heart of my inspiration. I'm especially drawn to colonial America and the American Revolution. In addition to historical romance, I also write time travel, paranormal, YA fantasy romance, and nonfiction. I'm published by The Wild Rose Press and have indie titles. Contact Me: bctrissel@yahoo.com
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8 Responses to Herbs and Flowers For A Fairy Garden

  1. carolee says:

    I’ve planted fairy gardens since my first daughter was three…..she’s 47 now! I still have a fairy garden on a somewhat shaded slope, and plant lots of miniature hostas, armeria, linaria, lily of the valley (a fairy favorite…they love anything with bells they can ring and fragrance!) sweet alyssum, miniature coral bells, and lots more. Can’t wait to set it up again this spring, but it’s snowing again today so I must be patient.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Josie says:

    Wow! How delightful and thought-provoking, Beth!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. marymarvella says:

    Such lovely flowers! You are so generous with your information about flowers!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Mary P says:

    . Such lovely flowers!

    Liked by 1 person

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